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If your drains aren’t working properly, they could let germs, bacteria, fungus, and mold build-up. Getting them cleaned regularly can prevent these problems and keep your pipes healthy.

Clogged drains can be a huge nuisance for homeowners. Luckily, there are several ways to clear them up without harsh chemicals. For more information visit Aurora CO Drain Cleaning.

Boiling water is one of the most commonly used methods for drain cleaning. It’s effective because the heat from the boiling water can melt or soften grease or fat that may be contributing to a clog. It can also help dissolve soap scum or other debris that has been collected in the pipe.

However, it’s important to use extreme caution when using boiling water to unclog a drain. The high temperature of the boiling water can burn skin and other surfaces if it comes into contact with them. This is called scalding and can be extremely painful. In addition, it’s important to take precautions when pouring hot water into a drain pipe, such as wearing protective gloves and ensuring not to overfill the pipe.

To use this method:

  1. Boil a pot of water and slowly and carefully pour it down the drain.
  2. Allow the water to work through the pipe for a few minutes before adding more.
  3. Repeat this process until the drain is clear or the clog seems to have dissipated.

It’s also important to note that this method is not recommended for PVC pipes, as the hot water can cause them to warp or melt.

If you cannot clear the clog with boiling water, it’s time to move on to other drain cleaning methods. For example, you can try a combination of baking soda and vinegar. First, pour a cup of baking soda down the drain, followed by a cup of white vinegar. The mixture will fizz and foam, helping to break up any gunk that’s causing the clog. Then, pour a pot of boiling water down the drain to flush out any remaining residue.

Baking soda and vinegar are common household products that can clear minor drain clogs. They are a cheap, eco-friendly alternative to chemical drain cleaners like Drano Liquid Plumr and can be used instead of a plunger.

Mixing baking soda and vinegar causes a chemical reaction that breaks down gunk and dissolves fat, hair, food waste, and other materials that cause drain clogs. Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is an alkaline base, and vinegar (acetic acid) is an acid, so they neutralize each other when combined. This creates a bubbling, foaming, clog-busting reaction. It also has slight disinfectant properties that can fight odor-causing fungi and bacteria.

Pour a pot of boiling water down the drain, then dump in 1/2 cup of baking soda. Cover the drain with a cloth or stopper and let it sit for three to five minutes. Then, add 1 cup of vinegar. Wait for the chemical reaction to break down clogs, then flush the drain with hot water. Repeat as needed until the drain is completely cleared.

Be careful not to use too much baking soda, which can overflow the drain and create a dangerous gas. You should also be careful not to use boiling water if you have PVC pipes, as it may damage their seals.

This DIY drain cleaner is inexpensive, non-toxic, and easy to make. Using it regularly can help prevent clogs and keep your kitchen sink and garbage disposal in good condition. Use a mesh drain strainer in your sink to catch hair and other gunk before it gets lodged in the drain. It would be best if you also cleaned out your garbage disposal regularly to avoid clogs and unpleasant odors.

Bio drain cleaners are made of bacteria that eat the gunk that lines your pipes, removing them as they go. They are all-natural products and safe for you, your family, your pets, and the environment. As an alternative to chemical drain cleaners, poured directly down the drain and left to work for several hours (overnight is best), bio drain cleaners can clear even the most stubborn clogs and keep your pipes clean and healthy.

Like all living things, bacteria must be consumed to survive, and they do that by eating organic waste such as fats, oils, greases, and hair. Once introduced to these substances, the bacteria in biological cleaners break them into water, carbon dioxide, and soluble fatty acids. This process is much more gentle than other chemical treatments and won’t damage your pipes or septic system over time.

The bacteria in these biological cleaners can also be used to maintain your plumbing systems. Pouring a small amount of the product down your drains regularly can prevent build-up, reduce odors, and keep your drains flowing freely.

Using caustic drain cleaners can cause serious damage to your pipes and can even lead to leaks, cracks, and breaks. The harsh chemicals and ingredients they contain can also burn you, your hands, face, or eyes and can create unpleasant and unhealthy fumes. In addition to their health risks, these caustic chemical cleaners can damage the environment. The toxic chemicals and residue they leave behind can contaminate the environment, affecting oceans, rivers, groundwater, and soil.

Clogged drains can be a huge hassle. A standard plunger is a simple, effective tool that can quickly and easily remove many types of clogs in sinks, tubs, and toilets without harsh chemical drain cleaners.

A plunger works by creating a vacuum seal over the drain or toilet opening and forcing air into the pipes, which pushes down on any water or debris that is trapped inside. A plunger is best suited for removing clogs in sinks and tubs, but it can also be used to unclog toilets with a little extra effort.

There are two common plungers: a cup plunger and a flange plunger. Both can be purchased at your local home improvement store. A cup plunger is good for sinks and tubs, while a flange plunger is better for toilets. Before using a plunger, ensure wet rags block all other outlets to prevent water from flowing elsewhere. This includes the overflow vent and any second drain in a sink or bathtub.

If a sink is clogged, start by pulling out the pop-up stopper and cleaning it off (see our guide on how to do this). Hair, soap scum, and other residue can build up here and create a clog. Try using needle-nose pliers or a metal coat hanger bent into a hook to grab any hair that is stuck on the stopper stem or rod.

After six plunger pumps:

  1. Check to see if the clog is gone.
  2. If not, repeat the plunging process.
  3. If the clog persists, consider using a snake or calling a professional to disassemble the trap and remove the clog.

Typically, a plumber’s snake (or closet auger) is used to break up and remove stubborn clogs too large for a plunger. There are hand-crank drain snakes you crank with your hands and motorized versions for use in a drill. Both types come in various lengths with different auger heads and options. Some snakes have coils that help retrieve objects stuck in a pipe, while others have choppers that cut through more solidified materials like sand, scale, or roots.

Before using a snake, it’s a good idea to prepare the area by removing the p-trap (the curved piping under the sink) and drain cover. This can make snaking more effective and help you locate the clog more easily. You should also pour water down the drain while you’re crawling to aid in clearing the pipes.

When you’re ready, push the head of the snake down into the drain opening and begin cranking the handle to feed it further into the pipe. Continue cranking until you feel resistance from a bend in the pipe or an object caught on the snake. Then, stop cranking and reposition the snake to clear the obstruction.

If the clog is especially stubborn, you may need to turn the snake’s head back and forth and up and up and down while feeding it to dislodge and remove it. If you cannot break up the clog, it’s best to contact a professional plumber to avoid damage to your pipes and prevent costly repair bills. Once the clog is removed, run water down the pipe to clear away any remaining debris and test your pipes for leaks. Then, clean and store your snake the next time you encounter a clog.